One Giant Board, Two World Records

Sixty-six surfers just rode the world's biggest board in Huntington Beach

The massive board, which cost an estimated $70,000-$90,000 to build, was craned out to the lineup.

The massive board, which cost an estimated $70,000-$90,000 to build, had to be craned out to the lineup. Photo: Clifford

Last weekend, more than 5,000 spectators covered the shores of Huntington Beach to watch sixty-six surfers climb aboard what can only be described as a huge-ass surfboard designed by Nev Hyman to set not one, but two Guinness World Records.

The board, supposedly an enlarged version of one of Brett Simpson’s models, weighed a dainty 1,300 pounds and had equally impressive dims: 42.125′ long x 11.08′ wide x 16″ (volume N/A). This board is now the largest surfboard to be constructed in the history of surfing and has its own part of the record books.

To claim the second Guinness World Record of the day (the most amount of people to ride a single surfboard at the same time), they had to surpass the 2009 feat at Snapper Rocks, where 47 Aussies rode a gargantuan board for 10 seconds. And surpass they did. The Huntington Beach participants, surfers of all ages and occupations (including Brett Simpson and Lakey Peterson), were towed into a wave by two jet-skies and managed to stay on the board for 13 seconds, crushing the previous record by three seconds. Take that, Aussies.

The board will be paraded down Main Street on July 4th and will officially find it’s housing at the International Surfing Museum, where it will take up some major real estate as an emblem of Huntington’s accomplishment.

WSL athletes Lakey Peterson and Brett Simpson, showing their support and California pride.

WSL athletes Lakey Peterson and Brett Simpson, showing their support and California pride. Photo: Clifford

The mega-surfboard was taken to sea via a forklift truck.

All aboard! Photo: Clifford

A few dozen surfers collectively doing the Huntington Hop. Photo: Burgess

A few dozen surfers collectively doing the Huntington Hop. Photo: Burgess

Word is the sixty-six may have earned a wildcard slot into the U.S. Open. Photo: Burgess

Word is the sixty-six may have earned a wildcard slot into the U.S. Open. Photo: Burgess

"You guys were officially amazing," said Michael Empric, adjudicator for Guinness World Records. "Welcome to the Guinness world record holder family."

“You guys were officially amazing,” said Michael Empric, (who waded to his waist in that suit as a witness) adjudicator for Guinness World Records. “Welcome to the Guinness world record holder family.”