Jamie Mitchell

During The Quiksilver In Memory of Eddie Aikau at Waimea Bay one year ago, SURFER staff photographers were running around like mad to document one of the most monumental events in the history of big-wave surfing. They uploaded images throughout the day to bring you live photo coverage of the event, but one of our photographers, Zak Noyle, was conspicuously missing in action. That’s because Noyle was swimming in the lineup, waterhousing in hand, dodging massive washthroughs for eight hours straight. Needless to say, he was a bit too preoccupied to send us photos live. Nevertheless, Noyle managed to capture the glory and the chaos of this year’s Eddie from the best seat in the house, all without taking too many bombs on the head. Take a peek at what the Eddie looked like from the water, and give it up for the big-wave hellmen (and photographers) who pushed themselves to the limits.

Ross Clarke-Jones & Jamie Mitchell

Ross Clarke-Jones (Left) and Jaime Mitchell (Deepest), share a colossal wave. Clarke-Jones went on to finish 2nd overall in the event.

Empty

An insider’s view of the waves on tap: Crystal-blue and menacing.

Kohl Christensen

As the swell pulsed, massive closeouts were punctuated by the occasional makeable wave. Kohl Christensen, hoping for the latter.

JOB

Jaime O’Brien, finding his center of balance as he negotiates the drop.

Twiggy and Kelly

From this angle, it looks like Grant "Twiggy" Baker is about to chop-hop onto Kelly Slater’s hairless dome. Thankfully, the 11-time world champ was able to quickly escape to the shoulder and avoid a potentially bad situation. Twiggy, however, was dealt a heavy blow.

Clyde Aikau

At 66, Clyde Aikau was the oldest competitor by far, but that didn’t slow him down a bit during competition. Clyde found numerous massive waves, showing the world what it means to be an Aikau.

Twiggy Baker

Early on in the event, Twiggy took one of the most fantastic spills of the day with this four-story elevator drop, which seemed to keep going…

Twiggy Baker

…and going…

Twiggy Baker

…and going…

Twiggy Baker

…and going…

Twiggy Baker

…and going…

Twiggy Baker

...and going. Luckily, this one looked worse than it seemed. Twiggy kept all his limbs firmly attached and made it back into the lineup to finish his heat.

Mark Healey

Mark Healey, no fear on the altitude drop.

Nathan Fletcher

Accidentally misidentified as Danilo Couto in online coverage (who held his own in the wipeout reel), Nathan Fletcher tries to tip-toe before skipping spectacularly into The Bay.

Koa Rothman

Clyde Aikau brought the crowd to its feet as the event's oldest competitor, but its youngest, 23-year-old Koa Rothman, tamed this drop like a seasoned veteran.

Makua Rothman

Makua Rothman outpaces a heavy one. Through the final round, Makua was the closest surfer still competing to challenge Florence's score of 301. He would finish the day with 231 points.

Dorian and JOB

Shane Dorian (Left) and Jamie O'Brien share a steep set.

Kelly and Jamie Mitchell

Kelly Slater catches a glimpse of Jamie Mitchell just in time before he disappears down the elevator shaft.

Ross Clarke-Jones

Ross Clarke-Jones looked on his way to becoming the Eddie's first repeat winner, leading for the majority of the event after some immaculate charges, including a 96-point score, the day's highest.

Twiggy Baker

Twiggy, racing mountains.

Kelly Slater

If anyone would get barreled at Waimea, it would be Kelly Slater. Riding on a microscopic 8'6", Kelly positioned himself square in the belly of a beautiful tube and channeled his old friend, the late Brock Little, who in 1990 caught Waimea's most famous Eddie tube shortly after committing its most famous wipeout.

Mason Ho and John Florence

Both Mason Ho and John John Florence grew up on the North Shore idolizing the men that pushed their limits in the Eddie, and at Waimea Bay, in general. These days, they are those men.

JJF

That’s the face of a man clearly impressed by the magnitude of his last ride.

Mason Ho

Mason Ho tackled monster drop after monster drop, not holding a thing back and proving to the Aikau family that he was more than worthy of the wildcard spot with which they'd gifted him. He would finish the event in 7th place.

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Mason Ho

Danilo Couto

Brazilian Danilo Couto, free-falling into oblivion.

Fletcher, Walsh, and Mel

Big waves shared, oversized boards required, and an assortment of colors displayed - just a few of the many reasons why the Eddie stands apart from other events. Nathan Fletcher, Ian Walsh, and Pete Mel, taking one on together.