The Pre-Surf Warm-Up That Works

Breaking down the five pillars of dynamic mobility with a strength and conditioning specialist

We’ve all seen the surfer who walks down to the edge of the water, sets the board in the sand, and gets cranking on calisthenics. With jumping jacks, arm wiggles, and thrusts in every direction, rest assured, you will always catch a few smirks and eye rolls from your fellow surfers. While warming up and stretching at the edge of the water comes off as a bit kook-y, nothing is worse than being landlocked as a result of pulling or tearing a muscle. We recently linked up with strength and conditioning specialist Brandon Glade, who works with the likes of Albee Layer and Oliver Kurtz, to break down five pre-surf stretches that do work. Because if you’re going to be that person stretching at the edge of the water, you might as well be doing it right. The following have been dubbed the five pillars of dynamic mobility for surfing, and their purpose is to fire up those muscles which you’ll use upon entering the water.

The Crunch And Roll

Why? The Crunch and Roll activates your core and gets blood flowing to your anterior chain of muscles, including your abs and hip flexors. This helps with your speed in popping up as well as your explosive strength through turns, carves, cutbacks, etc.

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The Reverse Table

Why? The Reverse Table activates your core and gets blood flowing to your posterior chain of muscles, including your gluteus and hamstrings. This balances your body, mimicking turns and layback, and opens up your shoulders for paddling. Both the Crunch and Roll and Reverse Table’s main focus is to get blood flowing through your core muscles, sparking your central nervous system and waking up your body for physical activity.

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The Half Moon

Why? The Half Moon opens up your quads and hips, which are notably tighter on surfers than those from other sports, mostly because of the way we are face-down in the paddling position. This helps with fluid, open surfing.

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The Hindu Push-Up

Why? The Hindu Push-Up opens up the anterior and posterior pelvic tilt, which is integral to your body’s movement while surfing. The looser your hips are, the looser your surfing will be. This stretch also works for the flexibility and mobility of the musculatures of your foot bed, which are important for balance, articulation, and dexterity in moving your surfboard. After all, the bottoms of your feet serve as the only connection between you and your surfboard once riding.

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The Torso Twist

Why? One of the most important parts of the rotational aspect of surfing is spinal mobility. The Torso Twist loosens up the lower back and gets blood flowing to the mid-section and spine. This helps with your power and stability during hard, torquing turns, when the upper body remains stable and the lower body completes the rotation.

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For more information and personal training, contact Brandon Glade (@gladepro) SURFfit.tv