Behind The Scenes of ’72 Hours’: A Weekend With The Mad Hueys

We gave The Mad Hueys three days to create, edit, and film their own travel reel

Last week, we gave you a first look at our POV project with Shane and Jackson Dorian: the two had 72 hours to create, film, and edit a 2-5 minute video with the GoPro Hero6 camera. We supplied the gear. The supplied the exploration, which they did, and they did so exceptionally.

But there was another team we wanted to see give it a go: The Mad Hueys, the fast-and-loose clothing brand of the Gold Coast’s Shaun and Dean Harrington. What measurable amount of Wild Times could The Hueys possibly fit into three days?

Cinematographer Joel Scott called South Australia’s Jye Demrich for advice on where to look for the strike. “Brother, we need to shoot a mental clip, and we got f–k all time,” Scott told Demrich. “Anything going off down where you are?” Demrich replied back: get on a flight to Adelaide on Sunday. They’d need to travel for it, but there was a day of fun beachbreaks awaiting them.

Scott boarded a plane for a three-hour flight from the Gold Coast with the Mad Hueys’ Brodie Sweeney and Brent “Midget Magic” Dorrington. Upon landing, it was pizza and beers until midnight, when the crew started their five-hour road trip through the South Oz desert. They arrived before dusk, eyes bleary from the travel and one drink too many.

“We pull up to the most amazing beachbreak set-up ever with not a soul in sight,” says Scott. “Brenno had never been to this location, and he’s losing it. The weather was cold and a little overcast, but none of that mattered. We had sick waves with no one around. It was literally a four-hour window of surf before the onshore winds got up. Brenno was going off on the perfect A-frame peaks and fun, little barrels, in the clearest water ever.”

“It was a long day shooting, then we set up camp for our only night, right where the desert meets the beach. We camped out, talked shit, drank a million beers, woke up with the worst hangover ever, and then hit the road again for a five-hour drive back to Adelaide for our flight home.”

In all, the trip was compact, and the crew’s methods efficient (“Being able to travel with all the gear we needed, as the cameras are bloody small, made the trip so much easier.”). Did that mean the trip was light on escapades and high-performance ripping? Not so much.

Below is a tease of the trouble that the Hueys got into and the waves they scored, and some snapshots of how it all went down. Stay tuned to Surfer.com for when the full edit drops.